Nonfiction

Book Review: The Rise of Wolf 8: Witnessing the Triumph of Yellowstone's Underdog

The Rise of Wolf 8: Witnessing the Triumph of Yellowstone's Underdog
Author: 
McIntyre, Rick
Rating: 
5 stars = Bohemian Rhapsody Awesome!
Review: 

I knew almost nothing about wolves going into this book and I am obsessed with them now. Rick brings such life to the initial wolves that were introduced into Yellowstone. I found myself fascinated with the lives of these wolves and rooting for certain wolves to "win."

Reviewer's Name: 
Melissa M.

Book Review: Fortitude

Fortitude
Author: 
Crenshaw, Dan
Rating: 
5 stars = Bohemian Rhapsody Awesome!
Review: 

This book is fantastic! Dan Crenshaw offers brilliant advice on mental toughness and how to combat the outrage culture with critical thinking. Crenshaw's methods are simple, easy to practice, and are what is missing in today's society. Written from his life experiences of being a Navy SEAL and United States Congressman, Crenshaw makes this book relatable and applicable to everyone's lives. Crenshaw also cites many articles, studies, and medical experts to backup his advice. I highly recommend this book to anyone who wants to become a well-informed voter, contributing citizen, or successful person.

Reviewer's Name: 
John

Book Review: The Boys in the Boat

The Boys in the Boat
Author: 
Brown, Daniel James
Rating: 
5 stars = Bohemian Rhapsody Awesome!
Review: 

Boys in the Boat tells the story of how nine men took gold during the 1936
Olympics in Berlin. As you read the book, you will feel the struggles of the
men to make the Washington rowing team as Juniors, compete for a spot in the
first boat as seniors, and overcome the biggest challenge yet in winning the
gold medal. This book is an easy five stars because of character development
and an easy to follow plot. I would recommend this book to anyone who wanted
to read about one of the most important Olympic gold medalists.

Reviewer's Name: 
Zach

Book Review: The Boy Crisis

The Boy Crisis
Author: 
Farrell, Warren & Gray, John
Rating: 
4 stars = Really Good
Review: 

This is a controversial book. Designed as a critique to modern day feminism, Farrell and Gray draw on decades of joint research and experience to debunk the patriarchy and discuss the way that our society is neglecting the needs of young boys and men. They argue that feminism has led to a crisis of education, mental health, and sexuality for boys and men whose needs are not being met.

As a feminist myself, I had a lot of reservations about reading this. I originally checked it out as part of ongoing research for an article I'm writing on cultural standards around masculinity and femininity in the US, but I disagreed with almost everything it stood for. However, I was stunned by how thoughtful and well researched this book is. Instead of being an attempt by privileged men to degrade women or advocate a traditional "women should be in the kitchen" philosophy, this book draws on decades worth of cutting-edge statistics to draw attention to the ways that a gendered society hurts everyone. It explained bias against men in the family court and criminal justice system, and questions the lack of conversation around male victims of domestic violence and sexual assault. These were all things that I had never even thought about or realized were a problem.

If you're anything like me, this is a book that will make you uncomfortable. It will challenge your preconceptions and force you to reconsider entire worldviews you've built your beliefs upon. The book is more than likely to hit the wall at least once before you're finished reading it. However, it will also deeply affect you. I came out of this book with a much more nuanced and well-rounded picture of what gender means in this world. I didn't agree with everything, and I'm still a feminist through and through, but I now realize that feminism is for men too. Gender equality is so much more complicated than what first meets the eye.

This book a must-read for anyone who's interested in gender politics. My biggest criticism (and the reason I didn't give it five stars) was that it often went off topic, particularly in the mental health section, and often discussed homeopathic remedies to ADHD and other things that felt irrelevant and detracted from the main message of the story.

Reviewer's Name: 
Mercy

Book Review: Naked Economics: Undressing the Dismal Science

Naked Economics: Undressing the Dismal Science
Author: 
Wheelan, Charles
Rating: 
5 stars = Bohemian Rhapsody Awesome!
Review: 

Naked Economics by Charles Wheelan is an immersive and amazingly simple look at global economics. The explanations and simple and number-free and the examples Wheelan uses give life to the subject which is considered torture buy adults and children alike. The book was required reading for an AP Economics class I took, and it brought the field to life, showing the massive effect of market forces and changes in exports and inflation and much more. It is an amazing introduction to the concepts of economics without the statistics. Anyone who is interested in how economics works or what is really going on when you listen to the federal reserve chair should read this book.

Reviewer's Name: 
Harrison

Book Review: My Sweet Angel

My Sweet Angel
Author: 
Glatt, John
Rating: 
5 stars = Bohemian Rhapsody Awesome!
Review: 

John Glatt does a great job in laying out this heinous murder, based on a true story. Managing to lay out a timeline with both moves and medical complications, Glatt exposes a mother who went to great lengths to do everything she could to create publicity for her sick son. The photos in the middle of the book, as heartbreaking as they are, make a much heavier impact if you wait until you've completed the book to look at them.

Reviewer's Name: 
Nicole E.

Book Review: The Lost Girls

The Lost Girls
Author: 
Glatt, John
Rating: 
4 stars = Really Good
Review: 

John Glatt is a very skilled investigative journalist and author. This book describes in chilling words the recall of "missing" girls in a small town and the murderer who tries to help "find" them along the way. As usual, Glatt's thorough research exposes the situation in depth. His delicate use of imagery gives all of the information you need to visualize his crimes without being a huge trigger for those with PTSD.

Reviewer's Name: 
Nicole E.

Book Review: Working with Difficult People

Working with Difficult People
Author: 
Hakim, Amy Cooper
Rating: 
3 stars = Pretty Good
Review: 

Occasionally, I come across a book that doesn’t really work as an audiobook. Working with Difficult People is certainly a must-have for any working-class bookshelf. Still, it was difficult to follow the thread of different difficult personalities when it was being read aloud. Sure, there were useful descriptions of the types of people you’ll encounter in the workforce, but there were at least a few of them where I wanted to slow down and read through those archetypes again to better understand the people who irk me in life. Of course, going in, I was hoping I could read this book and understand how to handle people who I find difficult to work with. Instead, I kept listening to these people's descriptions and finding individuals who nearly matched them in my life. This was my main qualm with the book: people are more complex than a single difficult personality type. They often have two or three of these attributes combined in varying amounts to create their unique level of challenge. Alternatively, I also listened to this book and tried to identify where I fell in the “difficult people” spectrum. It can be a bit of an eye-opener when you realize, “Oh, I do that. That difficult person is me.”

I may still want to get this book in physical form, not only to appreciate its handbook format but to use it as a writer resource. I do try and strive for an amount of realism in the villains I write, so using this book as a structure for why certain difficult people (read: antagonists) are the way they are can help me create more meaningful and relatable villains and should help me avoid the standard supervillain archetypes that paint an antagonist as “purely evil.”

A simple resource for classifying difficult people, I give Working with Difficult People 3.0 stars out of 5.

Reviewer's Name: 
Benjamin W.

Book Review: The Federalist Papers

Cover of The Federalist Papers
Author: 
Hamilton, Alexander; Madison, James; and Jay, John
Rating: 
5 stars = Bohemian Rhapsody Awesome!
Review: 

The Federalist Papers are one of the most fundamental documents in US history. It is not only an explanation of the functions of the Constitution, but it is a gateway into the minds and personalities of the founding fathers John Jay, Alexander Hamilton, and James Madison. I learned more about the Constitution than I ever thought possible. I learned the amazing complexities that were built into the most important document in the United States and the intended purposes of the three branches of government, as well as the arguments for increased federal power in governments. I would certainly recommend it to anyone who wants to learn about the foundations of American government and the minds of its founders.

Reviewer's Name: 
Harrison B.

Book Review: I Am Malala

I Am Malala
Author: 
Yousafzai, Malala
Rating: 
3 stars = Pretty Good
Review: 

"I Am Malala" was a pretty great book, and is now one of my personal favorites. It did not take me long to read and is good for anyone ages 12+. This book does contain some sensitive contents and might not be great for younger kids, unless the parents are okay with harsh and sad topics in the Middle East. The book does not contain a whole lot of content on what goes on in that area of the world, and it mostly focuses on Malala and her story. Malala is a young teen from the Swat Valley in Pakistan. She was raised peacefully, but the Taliban soon started to take over the area. The Taliban started like a little seed, but grew into a giant weed that basically controlled everything. They eventually made it so girls were not allowed to go to school, and women were not aloud out of their house unless they are accompanied by a male relative. Malala would not put up with this, for she has a desire to learn and know answers to her questions. She is the daughter of the principal of her school, and grew up admiring the students that attended. After surviving a bullet to the head, months in the hospital, and a move to England, Malala becomes activist and stands up for girl's rights and
her belief that everyone has the right to go to school. I liked this book because Malala is a great role model and author. She really provides a strong figure for any girl growing up in this hectic world. This is definitely one of the best books I have read and I am sure I will read it again in times to come. Any girl (or boy) can relate to Malala because she described herself as being an ordinary girl that wanted to see change in the world. She shows that anyone can adjust their view on the world if they just use their voice to speak out. I absolutely suggest this book to someone if they are looking for a fairly quick read!

Reviewer's Name: 
Sukhleen

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