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Sufia Davidson

Sufia immigrated to the United States after meeting her husband, Joshua Davidson. He is a soldier at Fort Carson and met Sufia in her home country of Afghanistan. The two were married in 2009 and in the first six years of their marriage had two beautiful children.

Sufia loved her new home and life but was still missing one thing she really wanted: a job. While attending GED test preparation classes at Pikes Peak Library District (PPLD), she was visited by Lacey Miller, PPLD’s Library Instruction Designer. Lacey told Sufia’s class about a new training opportunity: Food Industry Training. The certification program prepares participants in an intensive four week format to become qualified line and prep cooks.

“Miss Lacey told us that with this class you could learn lots of skills and you could find a job in the restaurant industry,” Sufia said. “I wasn’t sure I could do this, but then I talked to my husband. He told me to go do it because in my home country, I wouldn’t have an opportunity like this because I am a woman.”

Sufia enrolled in the program and began her intensive training during May 2019. Now, she’s a Food Industry Training graduate and working in a prominent Colorado Springs hotel.

Sufia DavidsonThe Food Industry Training program is recognized by the Pikes Peak Workforce Center and several other workforce centers in Colorado as an approved training option. Students learn the foundational skills necessary in the food service industry, such as: kitchen safety, knife skills, basic math, recipe reading, and cooking methods. Food safety and sanitation are part of every class. Real world life skills, including dependability, adaptability, memorization, time management, and team work are also of great emphasis. Work readiness skills like resume preparation, job search, and interview practice and preparation are included, too. Food Industry Training graduates have been hired by The Broadmoor, The Mining Exchange Hotel, UC Health hospitals, senior living centers, and others.

In the past, the Food Industry Training program has generously been hosted in kitchens at other organizations throughout the city. But, without a deep freezer, gas line, and necessary appliances, students have been unable to experience the full scope of working in a commercial kitchen and our program offerings have been limited to times when kitchen space was made available to us. This year, and with your support, PPLD is bringing this program in house with the renovation of kitchen space at Library 21C. Turning this space into a state of the art kitchen will help us grow and improve the Food Industry Training program and create new food education programs for our patrons. These programs, when we have been able to offer them, have been wildly popular!

In the time of COVID 19, when millions of Americans are experiencing joblessness and uncertainty, PPLD is proud to offer programs that will help members of our community get back to work. The Food Industry Training program helps not only individuals like Sufia, but area restaurants and businesses that are hurting in the aftermath of this public health crisis.

Will you support PPLD, and programs like Food Industry Training, by donating today? We serve you, your family, friends, and neighbors and exist to provide resources and opportunities that impact individual lives and build community.

Comments: 0
Kids Stem: The Ripple Effect of Kindness

Supplies:

  • A container filled with water
  • Various objects of different sizes and weights - examples: beads, rocks, pennies, small plastic toys

Directions:

  1. Drop in objects and observe the effect on the water
  2. Discuss what you see. Do you notice a ripple? Does it make a splash? What happens if you drop in lots of objects at once?
  3. Discuss how our behavior and actions also have an effect on the world around us.
  4. Make a list of acts of kindness you can do.
  5. Spread the ripple effect of kindness!

Watch this project at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zHM_X3wcmfQ&list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFctLfDQxsL5S...

Comments: 0
Kids Make: DIY Kites

Supplies:

  • Paper
  • Scissors
  • Glue stick
  • Hole punch
  • String
  • Stapler
  • Markers
  • Streamers (optional)

Directions:

  1. Fold a piece of paper in half hamburger style.
  2. Use a marker to mark one quarter of the way in on the creased edge.
  3. Take the top left corner of the top half of the paper and bend it to meet the mark you just made.
  4. Do the same with the opposite corner to create the "wings" of your kite. Take care not to fold the paper flat, you want the paper to form a funnel for the air to move through when you are pulling your kite.
  5. Staple the corners in place. You now have the body of your kite.
  6. Use a hole punch to create a hole behind the staple.
  7. Decorate! Use cut paper and markers to turn your kite into an animal, add streamers or long strips of paper to the back.
  8. Tie a string into the hole punch.
  9. You're ready to fly!

Watch this project at:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xIivPH2CcOc

Comments: 0
Information on COVID-19

Last updated June 29, 2020

Libraries Are Reopening!

After 15 weeks of closed doors at libraries in the Pikes Peak region, Pikes Peak Library District is excited to welcome you back into our facilities!

On Wed., July 1, PPLD will resume limited indoor Library services at almost all facilities and mobile libraries. Hours will vary by location, and the first hour will be reserved for people at higher risk of serious complications from COVID-19.

When you visit, you’ll be able to:

  • Browse the physical collection
  • Use self-checkout machines and service desks
  • Make one, 55-minute reservation for computers per day (Call (719) 389-8968 to make your reservation; Library card required to reserve by phone)
  • Use fax and copier machines without staff assistance
  • Charge your devices
  • Make a 55-minute reservation to access Special Collections in the 1905 Carnegie Library

Our staff has been busy behind the scenes preparing our spaces and designing ways to provide service while ensuring the health and safety of Library patrons, staff, and the community-at-large.

Here is what you can expect when you return to use the Library to help prevent the spread of COVID-19:

  • Cloth face coverings or masks will be required by all patrons and staff to enter all libraries. (If you do not have one, PPLD can provide you with a mask. Some exemptions do apply, such as for those under the age of 2.)
  • New capacity limits will be enforced at each location, and when capacity is reached, patrons will need to wait outside until others are ready to leave following their brief visits.
  • The number of patrons inside will be monitored at all times.
  • Staff will regularly sanitize frequently touched items like handles, counters, and copiers. Computers will be cleaned between each use.
  • If you retrieve a book from a shelf but decide you don’t want it, please place it on the designated cart instead of re-shelving it yourself.
  • All fax machines, copiers, and computers will be self-service only; staff can only offer assistance at services desks, behind a protective shield.
  • Some computers will not be available as we encourage patrons and staff to remain six feet apart in our computer labs (so make your reservation ahead of time by calling (719) 389-8968!)
  • Other items and areas that will remain temporarily unavailable or closed to the public: Furniture, water fountains, children’s play area, meeting and study rooms, studios, and makerspaces.

We ask that you keep your visits as brief as possible in order to minimize risk for everyone inside our libraries.

We would like to thank El Paso County Public Health for their authorization and support to reopen our doors to the public.



What else can I expect from PPLD?

Here’s an overview of what is available – and not available – to our Library cardholders and patrons at this time:

  • Ready to return items and pick-up holds, but don’t want to come inside? Our curbside service will still be available! Use the link to find out more and access Library service hours and pickup instructions.

  • Use the Library remotely! Stream and download books, audiobooks, comics, magazines, music, and videos. Use our databases to conduct research, access ample resources for kids and teens, and more from your couch.

  • Check out our virtual services! Our librarians are bringing their services to you, anywhere and anytime.


  • Have a question? Ask a librarian! Our staff are available to help you by phone, live chat, and email.

  • Checked out items: While many due dates were extended due to our temporary closure, many Library materials that were checked out prior to our closure are now due. Please check your PPLD accounts either through our Catalog or on the PPLD mobile app for the new return dates, which will be listed by item. (Returns are accepted outside of all libraries as part of curbside service.)

  • Fines & fees: We officially went fine-free for most Library materials in early 2019, as long as they are not lost or damaged. (See above regarding checked out items.)

  • OverDrive: Since more patrons are using PPLD digital resources online, cardholders can have 10 checkouts for a total of 14 days each; the holds limit remains at a total of 30. PPLD will continue to add copies of digital materials to our collection as our budget allows. Some digital checkouts can be returned early so others have opportunity for access. Instructions for checking out and returning are available here.

  • Library programs & reservations: All in-person Library programs and events held inside of PPLD facilities, along with public meeting and study room reservations, have been cancelled through at least Fri., July 31. Do note that this may be extended depending upon the state’s safer-at-home order and local public health guidelines.

  • Library card signup: Register online and start using your card immediately! If you sign up online during this time, your temporary account will be available for 90 days (instead of the usual 12-day limit), giving you immediate access to OverDrive and other digital resources from home. Bring your ID and proof of address to your nearest Library and they can activate your full privilege account curbside!

  • Account expirations & renewals: Library card/account expirations will be extended, including accounts that expired in the past 24 months.

  • Interlibrary loans: Due to staffing restrictions based on guidance from local public health officials, maintaining the current number of requests is not feasible. Therefore, we are decreasing the number of Interlibrary Loans requests to three per Library card. We expect requests to take longer to fulfill (borrowing or purchasing), with a potential wait time of four to eight weeks.

  • WiFi access: All library facilities continue to provide open WiFi access, which should be available outside of most PPLD buildings.

  • Book donations: Please keep books that you intend to donate. Direct such questions and concerns directly to the Friends of PPLD (online form).

What’s happening behind the scenes at PPLD?

All returned materials will be quarantined for a minimum of 72 hours before being processed and circulated. This time limit exceeds public health recommendations. (Items currently in our facilities haven’t been touched in several weeks.)

Per the safer-at-home order, the PPLD team can only work at half capacity inside our facilities. On-site staff are required to follow public health guidance like wearing face coverings, washing hands thoroughly and frequently, and maintaining proper distance during any in-person interactions. They are shelving books, pulling holds, quarantining returned materials, and helping circulate thousands of books, movies, and other items from PPLD’s large collection between our libraries.

Our librarians are still here for you virtually! Staff continue to take your questions by phone, live chat, and email. They’re also providing and expanding virtual services and programs, along with our digital collection. And, we’re working with community organizations, school districts, and other partners to support El Paso County residents with many different needs during the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond.

Have questions about COVID-19?
We understand that people may be concerned about COVID-19 and how it may affect them. Please check out the following public resources for more information:

What should I do?
To help stop the spread of germs and any contagious illness, local and national public health experts recommend that everyone should take everyday preventive actions and practice good hygiene. Here are some tips specific to the COVID-19 pandemic:

  • Put distance between yourself and other people; at least 6 feet apart.

  • Stay home if you’re sick.

  • Cover your mouth and nose with a cloth face cover whenever in public settings, such as grocery stores, pharmacies, medical facilities, hiking trails, etc.

  • Frequently and thoroughly wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. Use alcohol-based hand sanitizer, if you cannot wash your hands.

  • Keep your hands away from your eyes, nose, and mouth; avoid touching with unwashed hands.

  • Cover your mouth with tissue when coughing or sneezing, and then properly wash your hands.

  • Clean surfaces and personal items, such as cell phones, using household disinfecting products.

What is COVID-19?
There is a global pandemic situation involving a respiratory illness named COVID-19, which is caused by a new coronavirus that spreads through coughing or sneezing, much like influenza (also known as the flu). Since much is still unknown about the novel virus, no vaccine is currently available to prevent COVID-19 infection.
For current information and updates on the pandemic:

Comments: 24
Kids Stem: Cabbage Juice Chemistry

Supplies:

  • 2-3 purple cabbage leaves
  • 4 cups water
  • Blender
  • Strainer
  • Bowl
  • Paper towel
  • Several clear containers or cups
  • Vinegar
  • Baking soda
  • Optional: liquid dishwasher detergent, fruit juice, clear soda or carbonated water, soap, salt, other kitchen substances (with grownup approval)

Directions:

  1. Tear 2 to 3 leaves off the head of a purple cabbage, tear leaves into smaller pieces.
  2. Put cabbage leaves into a blender with about 4 cups of water and with a grownup's help, blend on high until the liquid is very purple with a few chunks remaining.
  3. Strain cabbage juice into mesh strainer lined with paper towel, over a large bowl.
  4. Pour the cabbage juice into a container or pitcher. This purple cabbage juice is now your pH indicator.
    Purple cabbage juice contains a compound called anthocyanin. Anthocyanin will turn pink when mixed with acid, blue-green when mixed with a base, and purple when mixed with a neutral substance, such as water.
  5. Take 3-4 additional clear containers: add a spoonful of baking soda to one cup; add a few spoonfuls of vinegar to a second cup; add a bit of water to a third cup.
  6. Ask your grownup if you can use a small amount of dishwasher detergent into an additional cup.
  7. Now, you'll add some cabbage juice to each of the four cups you've prepared, even the one that's just water. When the purple cabbage juice is mixed with vinegar, what happens? (You should see the mixture turn pink.) Why? Vinegar is an acid. Pour cabbage juice into the container with baking soda, then also the cup with the dishwasher soap. What is happening to these two solutions? (Baking soda is a base, so it will turn bluish-purple. The dishwasher soap mixture should turn a vivid blue-green because dishwasher soap is very basic, or alkaline.) What happened when you added cabbage juice to just water?
  8. Line your four cups up on the counter. You will use these color results to compare other substances you want to test to see if they are acids or bases.
  9. Pink indicates an acid. Place this cup to the left. Purple (water) is neutral. Place this one in the middle. Blue-green is basic. Place this cup to the right of the purple cup. If you used dishwasher detergent, place this cup to the very far right. It’s one of the most alkaline substances you will find in a kitchen.
  10. Now, try adding purple cabbage juice to other substances you want to test.
  11. Compare the colors of your test mixtures and place them between the cups, where you think they should go. Soon, you will have a spectrum of acids and bases and you can compare the acidity of two substances, such as vinegar vs. orange juice.

Watch this project at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7nB1UzYZf4s&list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFctLfDQxsL5S...

Comments: 0
Kids Make: Crunchy Baked Cotton Balls

Supplies:

  • Cotton balls
  • 1 cup flour
  • 1 cup water
  • Large mixing bowl
  • Food coloring
  • Baking sheet
  • Small bowls or cups
  • Either cooking spray or tin foil
  • An adult to help with the oven

Directions:

  1. Mix 1 cup of flour with 1 cup of water in the large bowl.
  2. Get your baking sheet ready by spraying it with baking spray or covering it with tin foil.
  3. Divide the flour and water mixture into 4 to 6 small bowls or cups, depending on how many colors you want.
  4. Add 5 to 8 drops of food coloring to each cup and mix well. Remember that you can make different colors by mixing the food coloring; red and yellow make orange and blue and red make purple.
  5. Dip each cotton ball into a cup. Be sure to cover the whole cotton ball with the mixture – make it nice and thick.
  6. Set the coated cotton balls on your baking sheet.
  7. Let an adult help you with this part. Bake your cotton balls in a 300 degree oven for about 45 minutes.
  8. After that, take the cotton balls out and let them cool completely – at least an hour. They should have a nice, hard, crunchy shell.
  9. Find a small hammer, a toy hammer, or even a rock. Take your cotton balls outside and - SMASH THEM WITH THE HAMMER! That’s right – smash away.

Extra fun:

Use more cotton balls to make a baked sculpture. Use the same dipping method, but keep the sculpture in the over a little longer – about 55 minutes. You can make and smash a crunchy monster!

To watch this project visit: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mvw4q6cr6xY&list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFctLfDQxsL5S...

Comments: 0
Kids STEM: Colorful Science

Colorful Experiment #1

Supplies:

  • Milk
  • Plate
  • Liquid Food coloring
  • Dish Soap
  • Q-tips

Directions:

  1. Pour the milk into a plate until you cover the bottom surface.
  2. Add drops of food coloring in middle of the milk in the plate.
  3. Coat the Q-tip in the dish soap and dip it in the milk. Watch what happens!

The science behind this reaction has to do with the way the soap molecules and the fat from the milk are interacting. Fat is hydrophobic, a type of molecule that repels water. By adding the soap, we are breaking up the hydrophobic fat particles and holding it inside the soap.

Colorful Experiment #2

Supplies:

  • Hard coated candy
  • Plate
  • Warm water

Directions:

  1. Put the candy pieces in the plate. You can place them around the edge, or any other design you can think of!
  2. Add some warm water to the plate, making sure that there is enough to cover the bottom of the plate. Watch what happens!

The science behind this interaction has to do with the warm water dissolving the color coating on the candies.
Each of the candies has a slight difference in the sugar content, which means they have different densities; they all take up a different amount of space. The reaction we are seeing here is called stratification, where water splits due to differences in the density of the materials.Try cold water and even different kinds of candy. What happens?

Watch these projects at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9geJ7KdXqK0&list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFctLfDQxsL5S...

Comments: 0

Black Lives Matter and so we celebrate Black Voices in stories for children. These picture books are available at the Pikes Peak Library District. Click on the pdf link below to see the booklist.

Comments: 0
Maker in Residence: Textile Art with Textiles West

To close out the Spring Maker in Residence program, Textiles West is extending the Textile Art project into the summer!

If you are interested in participating in the Textile Art project, but don’t have supplies such as needle, thread, or fabric readily available at home, we’ve got you covered.

To participate, select a Library location from the list below. The link will take you to that Library’s event calendar listing. After you register, PPLD staff will send a supply packet with project instructions to the Library location that you picked. Then, Library staff will contact you when your supply packet is available for pickup, which you can access through our Curbside Services. Once you have your supply packet, you can get started on the project!

Participating Libraries


Project Q&A

If you registered for a Maker in Residence: Textile Art program, or have already been working on a collage piece for the Textile Art project, you are welcome to attend one of these virtual Q&A sessions!

Textiles West Maker Liz Kettle will be available to chat directly with participants and answer project-related questions. This discussion will be hosted via Zoom, and a Zoom link will be emailed to registered participants.

Q&A Dates


Returning Finished Collage Pieces

When your collage piece is finished, bring it back to the Library so it can be included in the community art installation. Please return it by July 31!

  • If you participated in one of the registration-based programs, please return your finished piece to your selected Library.
  • Otherwise, return your finished piece to your local Library! Please include a note to deliver it to Amber Cox at Library 21c.

If you want to participate in the art installation but don’t want to give away your finished collage piece, don’t worry – you can also share a photo of your project for inclusion in a digital installation! Submit a photo by filling out this form.


Textile Art Project

This project is traditionally a textile (fabric) project, but Liz and Ruth have adapted the project to use just about any materials you have at home. Get started by looking through the various PDF project patterns (see below) and reading through this tutorial PDF. This will give you a basic idea of the project and let you know what supplies you’ll need to get started.

Then, watch the video below to see Liz explain how to get creative and pull it all together! (Please note the video cuts off at the end, but all important content is included.) Links to supplementary videos examining various stitch types are also available below.

We can’t wait to see what you create!


Patterns

Supplementary Videos

The Makers


Textiles West's teachers are all experts who know the power of creating and understand that for many, textiles are a much more accessible art form than traditional art forms.

Liz Kettle

Liz KettleThrough her work, Liz Kettle tells tales that are personal as well as those that speak of relationship, humanity, and the earth. She chooses a nontraditional palette of fabric and stitch because she believes they connect us and draw us closer in a way that cannot be achieved with traditional art materials alone. Liz uses a variety of techniques drawing from the deep wells of quilting, mixed media collage, and paint to tell and support each unique story.

Liz is the co-founder and Director of Textiles West, a Textile Art Center that aims to inspire widespread awareness, participation, and appreciation of textile and fiber arts.

Liz is passionate about teaching and is a co-author of two books; Fabric Embellishing: The Basics and Beyond and Threads: The Basics and Beyond. She is also the solo author of First Time Beading on Fabric, Layered and Stitched and Know Your Needles. Liz has articles published in Quilters Home, Quilting Arts, Quilting Arts In Stitches and Cloth Paper Scissors Studios, and has appeared in the PBS show Quilting Arts TV.

Ruth Chandler

Ruth ChandlerRuth Chandler grew up in Japan where the vibrant color and texture of Japanese fabric, combined with the simplicity of Japanese design, caught Ruth’s attention. Ruth learned basic Sashiko from an elderly neighbor and at the age of four, and began to create and sew her own clothes at the age of ten which became an outlet for her imagination and creativity.

She made her first quilt in 1990, a queen size, hand-appliquéd and hand-quilted Hawaiian pineapple quilt, and she has never looked back. In her own unique style she loves to use new techniques mingled with the old and her work usually shows the influence of her years spent in Japan. Shibori, Boro, Sashiko, and indigo dying are her love, however she also teaches garment sewing and other classes to children and adults.

Ruth teaches locally at Textiles West in Colorado Springs, and nationally at Art and Soul Retreats. Ruth has written several articles for Quilting Arts magazine, blog posts for Havels’ Sewing, and has work published in several books. Additionally, Ruth is one of the co-authors of the best-selling book, Fabric Embellishing: The Basics and Beyond, and is the solo author of Modern Hand Stitching.

Ruth may be contacted for nationwide classes at ruthachandler@comcast.net

Comments: 2
Kids Make: Summer Solstice Celebration Crafts

Shadow Art

Supplies:

  • Animal toys
  • Blocks
  • Large paper
  • Marker
  • Watercolors or crayons

Directions:

  1. Set up toys and blocks in a sunny area outside, preferably on a hard surface.
  2. Put a large piece of paper next to the toys and position it so that the shadows of the toys can be seen on the paper.
  3. Trace the shadows with a thick, black marker.
  4. Try tracing several times throughout the day to track how the shadows change shape as the sun travels across the sky.
  5. Add watercolors or crayons to make your shadow art come to life!

Nature Crowns

Supplies:

  • Two long strips of paper 1 - 2 1/2 inches wide
  • Colorful paper
  • Cardstock
  • A pencil
  • Scissors
  • Glue
  • Stapler

Directions:

  1. Draw petal and leaf shapes on your colorful paper. You can create templates for your petal and leaf shapes by drawing on a thick paper, cutting out the shapes, and tracing it onto the colorful paper.
  2. Cut out flowers and leaves.
  3. Use glue and/or stapler to attach the long strips of paper.
  4. Glue on flowers leaves.
  5. Wrap your crown around your head to find the right length for you and then glue or staple it together.
  6. Your nature crown is now ready to wear!

Time Capsule Envelope

Supplies:

  • An envelope
  • Paper for writing or drawing
  • Markers or colored pencils

Directions:

  1. Decorate your envelope, write Summer Solstice 2020, and a include a future date when the envelope can be opened.
  2. Take some time to write about what today means to you. What are your hopes and dreams for the future?
  3. Take a walk and collect some nature treasures to include in your envelope, draw a picture, add in anything else you’d like!
  4. Put in a safe place to store until it can be opened again.

Watch these projects at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jy4f4OV_KJ8&list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFctLfDQxsL5S...

Comments: 0
Summer Adventure presented by Children's Hospital of Colorado

Have an adventure with Pikes Peak Library District this summer! Our Summer Adventure presented by Children’s Hospital Colorado game helps kids and teens stay engaged and active over the summer months, despite the COVID-19 pandemic. We know you’re looking for at-home activity ideas, and we are here to help!

Anyone ages 0 - 18 can participate and win prizes through reading, moving, and imagining. Either participate in one of our virtual programs or use one of our activity ideas!


Read, Imagine, and Move activities for ages 0 - 12.

Read, Imagine, and Move activities for ages 12 - 18.


The adventure runs from June 1 – July 31. You can set up your account now at ppld.beanstack.org. Or, print a game card below.

Also check out our FAQ.

Beanstack FAQs: ppld.beanstack.org/faq

Click here for group registration information.

Be in the know!

Sign up to receive emails for summer virtual programs, activities, and more for ages 0 - 18 in June and July. You can unsubscribe at any time.

Completed your Adventure?

Ready to pick up your prizes? Complete your registration in Beanstack and head to your local Library!

We want to know what you think! Please complete the survey below to be entered to win an iPad!

Children/Teens (en español)
Parents/Caregivers(en español)


Summer Challenges

This summer, we're challenging you to use your imagination and create! Your entry could be featured on social media and the homepage of ppld.org. We'll select one winner for each challenge, who will win a $25 gift card to Poor Richard's Books & Gifts. Show off what you've made and be inspired by the creativity of others.

  • Challenge 1: LEGO Build

    Click here to see everyone's creations!

  • Challenge 2: Rock Painting

    Click here to see everyone's creations!

  • Challenge 3: Fort Building

    OK, engineers: it's time to build a fort. Whether building outside with sticks or inside with couch cushions, you are tasked with creating your very own home away from home. It must be made out of what you already have at home and you have to be able to fit comfortably inside. Don't be afraid to personalize it! Post a photo on Facebook between Thu., July 2nd - Wed., July 15th.

    Entries must include #ppldsummerchallenge and tag @ppldkids or @ppldteens to be eligible to win. Or email your photo to summerchallenge@ppld.org and we will post it to social media for you.

    Please note that all entries will be added to social media and some may be featured on our webpage.

    Need some inspiration? Check out a wilderness survival guide with information on crafting a lean-to or peruse an illustrated guide to architecture. Find some fun indoor fort ideas from Red Tricycle.


Calendars


Game Cards

You can track on the Beanstack app, pick up a game card at any curbside location or participating distributors, or click here to download and print a physical game card from home! (en español)

Need a version that uses less ink? Click here!

Participating Distributors:


How to Play the Game

  1. Complete an activity (either Read, Imagine, or Move) any day in June and July to earn points.
  2. Record the dates you complete an activity on a printed game card or in Beanstack. You can log your progress at ppld.beanstack.org or by using the Beanstack App, available in Google Play or the App Store.
  3. You earn 50 points for each day that you complete an activity. You will receive a prize for participating in the game, plus you’ll be entered in the grand prize drawing when you reach 1500 points (30 days of activities).
  4. Prize pickup will begin in July. Check back here to find the most up-to-date information on how to pick up your prizes.

If you need assistance, call (719) 531-6333 or visit ppld.org/ask to find different ways to get in touch with our staff.


As our programs will be virtual this year, you can download themed video conferencing backgrounds below!


Comments: 0
13th Annual PPLD Teen Art Contest

Vision 20/20!

PPLD challenged teens expressed their vision for the future and considered the past through art. Prizes were awarded to top finishers in Middle School and High School categories.


Submissions are closed. Check back in December 2020 for information on how to enter the 2021 contest.

Due the the pandemic, we were unable to present winners and artwork in our Libraries. This year, we will feature all six winners on our social media and on the home page of our website. We will feature a winner every day from Tue., June 9 through Sun., June 14.

We announced the winners via email. There's a lot of information packed in the message, so please make sure to read it thoroughly!

If you are unable have any issues with pick-up, please reply to the email and we will make different arrangements.

Again, congratulations to all of you! Thank you so much for your patience while we figured all of this out!


The winners of the Vision 2020 art contest are:

Middle School Second Place:
If Families Were United by Lexi H.
if families were united

High School Second Place:
Social Commentary by Bo A.
social commentary

Best in Show:
Ancient Future by Emilina S.
ancient future

Middle School First Place:
Colorful Year Ahead by Emma P.
colorful year ahead

High School First Place:
Emotions Never Die by Amelia U.
emotions never die

Coordinators’ Choice:
Summer Joy by Kyra S.
summer joy


If you have additional questions or need help, please contact Joanna Rendon, jrendon@ppld.org.

Keep busy with this year's Summer Adventure presented by Children's Hospital Colorado!

Comments: 4

Given our stand against racism, along with the continued national and local conversations, we want to highlight and celebrate the Shivers Fund.

Clarence and Peggy Shivers created the Shivers Fund at Pikes Peak Library District, in concert with PPLD, in 1993. They introduced the Shivers African American Historical and Cultural Collection at PPLD, which continues to expand annually thanks to the Shivers Fund and its many supporters. In addition to the collection, the Shivers Fund at PPLD also provides opportunities for our community to celebrate history, culture, and the arts. The Fund hosts concerts and other events, as well as helps expands educational and cultural opportunities for young people to encourage tolerance and diversity.

Our Library District and Foundation applaud the Shivers Fund for its continued investment to create more tolerance, diversity, and community in the Pikes Peak region.

Learn more about the history and work of the Shivers Fund.

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Kids STEM: DNA Spiraling Suncatcher

Supplies:

  • 18 gauge jewelry wire
  • 200 or so beads (pony beads, jewelry beads, or any beads that will fit on your wire)
  • Small wire cutters
  • Small pliers or other tool for bending the wire
  • Piece of string or ribbon for hanging

Directions:

  1. With the wire cutters, cut two lengths of 18 gauge wire about 24 inches long and 6 to 8 more shorter pieces about 3 inches long.
  2. Wrap the two long pieces of wire around a round bottle or jar that has a circumference of about 7 inches, then release the wires. They should fall into a loose spiral.
  3. Using the small pliers, twist one end of each spiral into a small circle. This is so that your beads will not fall off.
  4. You’ll need 65-75 beads to fill the length of each of the two spirals. If you work with a partner, you can each choose beads for one spiral. (These will be sun catchers when you’re finished, so make them pretty!)
  5. When the spirals are full: Using the small pliers, twist the top end of each wire into another small circle to hold the beads on.
  6. Loop the piece of string or ribbon through both spirals at the top so they hang together.
  7. Now, using the small pliers, attach one end of each of the short pieces of wire along the length one of the two spirals and fill each one with beads, leaving enough wire to attach the other end to the second spiral. Space the shorter pieces out evenly. These should make what looks like a spiraling ladder with beaded rungs along the length of the ladder. It helps to have a partner to hold the spirals for you while you work.
  8. You have made a beautiful DNA Sun Catcher! Hang your DNA double helix model in the window to remind you how beautiful and unique you, and each of us, are.

THE SCIENCE: DNA is short for deoxyribonucleic acid. Long strands are connected by genetic material to form a double helix. Inherited traits from your ancestors are located in your DNA. DNA is found in all living organisms.

Watch this project at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FuTVAt31POw&list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFctLfDQxsL5S...

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Community Conversations: Building Police and Community Relations

Community Conversations at Pikes Peak Library District is a new series of monthly events that invites the public to discuss current events and issues impacting the Pikes Peak region. We want to promote civil dialogue and greater understanding of different perspectives.

Community Conversation: Building Police and Community Relations


Recent events have our community, like others around the nation, hurting. Biased policing has become a point of discussion as violence crossing racial lines has provoked racial tensions and led to large scale protests. Where do we go from here? How do we begin to build stronger and safer police and community relationships? There is a shared desire for safer communities, fair and unbiased law enforcement, and the ability for law enforcement to safely do their jobs throughout our community. How do we get there?

Join us for a virtual community conversation on this important issue.

  • When: Thu., June 25 from 7 - 8 p.m.
  • Where: Registered participants will be emailed a link for the conversation before the program.
  • Click here to register.

Click here for resources.


Keep an eye on our calendar to join us for future conversations on timely and relevant topics to the Pikes Peak region. More information to come on locations and times!
Please note topics may change:

  • July: Affordable Housing
  • August: Immigration
  • September: 2020 Election: Concerns and Aspirations
  • October: Police Relations
  • November: Military and Veterans
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Kids Make: 3D Garden Art

Supplies:

  • Paper, any color
  • Cupcake liners, large and small
  • Markers
  • Glue
  • Buttons or stickers
  • 5" pieces of pipe cleaners or twist ties

Directions:

  1. Flower: flatten a cupcake liner. Fold it in half and trim around the edge of the liner, cut the edge so that it's scalloped like a flower petal. On the colored paper, using a marker, draw a stem. Glue the center of the back of the flattened, cut liner at the top of the stem. For a leaf, cut a flattened cupcake liner into small slices. Cut the edges of two slices, making them more pointy at the end like leaves. Glue onto the stem of your cupcake liner flower.
    Cut a smaller cupcake liner and glue to the center of your flower. Add a button or sticker to the very center of your flower. Bend edges of flowers outwards for a 3-D effect.
  2. Dragonfly: fold a quarter of a liner in half and in half again to make a long skinny triangle. Cut the edge again in a curvy way. Open it up and cut it down the middle. Cut each piece down the middle again. Take two small pieces and glue onto the paper to make the wings, add a piper cleaner bent double and twisted together for the body, leaving the ends free for antennas. Glue onto paper between the wings.
  3. Sideways Butterfly: Take a quarter of a cupcake liner and fold once. Cut a curvy edge. Pinch the liner piece in the middle so that it sticks up in the center. Do another. Glue both onto the paper just at the edges and place two twisted pipe cleaners cut short, or twist ties below the wings, leave the ends free to be antennas. For a front facing butterfly, take four quarters of a cupcake liner and cut wavy edges. Place and glue on the paper, with two on each side, add a pipe cleaner in the middle, leaving the ends as antennas.

Watch this project at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TmHgRfJ-FPk&list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFctLfDQxsL5S...

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Statement on Racism and Inequity

PPLD commits itself to join the efforts of all who share its mission of building a community free of racism, hatred, and intolerance. Our full statement is below:

Providing resources and opportunities that impact individual lives and build community – that is the mission of Pikes Peak Library District. Our community, like others across the nation, is hurting. Just as it is our mission to build community, it is our duty to speak against the forces that would tear us apart.

The killings of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and Ahmaud Arbery have reminded all of us once again that the battle against racism and intolerance is not over. For many individuals, those forces are a constant in their lives, and that battle is waged on a daily basis. For those of us who do not experience the burden of systemic racism, events such as these may briefly ignite an urgent desire to seek justice and true equality for Black members of our community. All too often, though, we allow that sense of urgency to gradually disappear until the next horrific act of violence occurs. This cycle must stop.

PPLD stands with those in El Paso County and throughout our country who are exercising their Constitutional rights to protest against systemic racism, inequity, and violence against the Black community. As a public library, we stand for the innate equality of all we serve. We pledge to do our part to help our community realize that diversity, inclusivity, and equity are pillars of a strong and thriving community and that if even one individual is harmed through injustice or racism, our entire community suffers. This is not the time to simply move on until the next act of violence jars us from our complacency. PPLD commits itself to join the efforts of all who share its mission of building a community free of racism, hatred, and intolerance.

- John Spears, Chief Librarian & CEO, and Debbie English, President of PPLD’s Board of Trustees


In response to these events, PPLD has curated a list of resources for our community.
Click here to find links to national and local news coverage, deeper background on the issues, books, and other items here.


Let's Talk about Racism: Digital Book List

The African American Historical and Cultural Collection, funded by the Shivers Fund at PPLD

Let's Talk about Racism: Teen Collection

Let's Talk about Race and Racism: Children's Collection

Celebrating Black Voices: Picture Books


Social and Systemic Injustice Movies on Kanopy
Catalog links from booklist below:
Additional Resources
For Adults:

For Kids:

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Kids STEM: LEGO Balloon Car

Supplies:

  • Balloon
  • Legos (may vary):
    • (1) 1x2 window (no glass)
    • (2) 2x10 flat plates
    • (1) 2x12 flat plate
    • (6) 3/4" wheels
    • (3) 2x2 axles
    • (1) 2x2-2x1 tall sloped grey brick
    • (1) 2x1 tall white brick

Directions:
Assemble Lego pieces to create a car.
Tips: make the car lightweight, long, and build a tall stand for the balloon to attach to. Insert the balloon into the window (or whatever you create to hold the balloon), inflate the balloon, place on flat surface, and let it go! Measure to see who's car has gone farthest.

Watch this project at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PF4_xMovgG0&list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFctLfDQxsL5S...

Comments: 0
KidsMake: Dry Ice Bubble Art

Supplies:

  • One small block of dry ice (about 1 lb.) broken into large pieces. (Do not touch dry ice with bare skin, it will burn!)
  • Large bowl on a tray
  • Table covering
  • Warm water
  • Dish soap
  • Food Coloring
  • Paper (any kind)

Directions:

  1. Pour warm water into the bowl.
  2. Add 2-3 squirts of dish soap (it may help to stir the solution gently at this point although I didn't).
  3. Add a chunk of dry ice using tongs or garden gloves.
  4. As bubbles rise up, add food coloring (2-4 colors).
  5. Lay paper over the colorful bubbles and press gently into bubbles. Add a different color and repeat with another piece of paper.
  6. Keep adding warm water and chunks of dry ice. Or start over with a fresh batch.
  7. Enjoy your wonderful bubble art!

Watch this project at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=852TC3_bSbU&list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFctLfDQxsL5S...

Comments: 0
Food Industry Training

Are you looking for a career in the culinary industry? Pikes Peak Library District is pleased to offer Food Industry Training, a four-week training program that gives you the skills you need to enter or advance in employment as a qualified prep cook or line cook. The program will help you learn basic culinary fundamentals, explore career opportunities in the culinary industry, prepare a resume and practice interview skills, and earn your ServSafe Food Handler certification.

No previous experience is required and there is no cost to participants.



Knowledge, Skills and Abilities
  • Basic math skills
  • Dependability
  • Adaptability
  • Memorization
  • Time management
  • Communication
  • Physical demands: Manual dexterity, ability to stand for long periods of time.
What you’ll learn:
  • Knife skills
  • Cooking methods
  • Understanding recipes
  • Food safety and sanitation
  • Culinary math

Please check back for future dates. Any questions, please contact the Adult Education Department at (719) 531-6333, x1225 or tsayles@ppld.org.

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J.K. Rowling's newest book, The Ickabog, will be published for free starting on May 26 until July 10 on https://www.theickabog.com/home/. The book will be released chapter by chapter (or more) every weekday. The book will be officially published in November 2020 with the royalties being donated to help people affected by the coronavirus. This is not a Harry Potter book but a brand new story.

There is also an illustration competition for children! Visit the website https://www.theickabog.com/home/ for more information.

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Cupboard Crafts & Experiments: CD Case Robots

Supplies:

  • 1 CD Case (empty) with clear cover or small shallow square gift box without lid.
  • 1 piece of cardboard cut from cereal box
  • 1 piece of colored construction or printer paper
  • Small pieces of colorful scrap paper
  • 1 barcode cut from any cardboard or paper product
  • Liquid glue and/or glue sticks
  • Scissors
  • Miscellaneous small items--Examples: Stickers (especially Foamies), bottle caps or other small plastic lids.
  • Craft bling: small Beads, pipe cleaner pieces, buttons, paper clips or tiny binder clips, circle stickers (file folder labels), bendable straws (pieces), tiny flat or connector LEGO pieces, very small keys, old puzzle pieces, metal nuts and washers

Directions:

  1. Glue construction paper to a piece of cardboard, or just use the brown cardboard.
  2. Decorate CD case. Open case and place fun small items inside the case, glue items if needed. Close the case, set aside.
  3. Take construction paper or cardboard. Leaving space in the middle for the CD case. Glue on paper legs, arms, and head of robot.
  4. Glue on CD case to make the body of the robot.
  5. Decorate the robot's face with fun items.

Watch this project at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N6vaRll6nJE

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Pikes Peak Library District is pleased to announce the winners of the 2020 Jean Ciavonne Poetry Contest for Children:


Bricks of Wheat
By Cooper Alvin

As I come home from school, filled with resent,
I see cold cream of wheat, hard as cement!
I thought what could be built with such hard a material,
Build skyscrapers out of this rock-hard cold cereal.
A new way of building! Who would of thought evolution
Could lead to such a disgusting solution.

Cream of wheat bricks! Now that’s something new!
Guess the trick to construction is edible goo!
Someone says: “The tallest building is inside Dubai.”
“That’s nothing! Build it with soup!” I reply.
We’d build it high and we’d build it wide.
Why would we do it? ‘Cause nobody’s tried.

A cream of wheat pool? No, that’d be just gross.
A cream of wheat coaster? (sigh) That’d be shunned on by most.
A cream of wheat car? Something no one would borrow.
Well, I’m out of ideas! Come back tomorrow!


Chocolate Peppermint Delight
By Emily Lunsford

One day during lunch,
My friend and I chatted.
She asked,
“If you could invent a dessert,
ANY dessert,
What would it be?”
We started sharing,
And worked together to imagine…
The Chocolate Peppermint Delight!

A chocolate lava cake,
But with peppermint bits in the lava!
Sweet, creamy vanilla ice cream,
With chocolate chip cookie crumbled in
On top of the cake.
A peppermint shell,
For the luscious ice cream.

Topping it off,
Caramel sauce,
And don’t forget
The flavorful peppermint sauce!
Whipped cream generously deposited
Around the plate,
And up the cake.

Coming out from our dream
Of heavenly desserts,
We smiled, thinking about
The luxurious treat.
Our mouths watering,
We looked down at our trays of cafeteria food.
And our otherwise fine tacos,
They didn’t seem nearly as good anymore.
Nor did our fruit cups,
Or our milk.
With the Chocolate Peppermint Delight on our minds,
Everything else faded in comparison,
To a dull gray.

It’s funny how a daydream,
A vision of succulent delicacies,
Can bleach perfectly fine food,
Leaving only the fantasy,
Bright and colorful.
That day I learned
That pure imagination
Can achromatize
Reality.


Bitter and Sour
By Azul Padilla

I’m grabbing a mango
Dancing like a weirdo
Cutting the mango
Nice and yellow
I ask my mother
Can you pass me the chili powder
I sprinkled it all over
Bitter and sour


How to Make a Pot of Rhino Stew
By Avery Pilkington

How to make a pot of rhino stew:
Add these five things to your Crockpot
Slice up some carrots
Chop up some potatoes
Dice up some worms
Add one huge RHINO
Add a dash of ground herbs
Put the lid on
Cook for SEVEN HOURS


The Life of a Cupcake
By Maya Rebugio

They put me in the oven to bake.
Me, a depressed and miserable cupcake.
Feeling the heat, I started to bubble.
Watching the others, I knew I was in trouble.

They opened the door and started my life.
Frosting me with a silver knife,
Decorating me with candy jewels.
The rest of my batch looked like fools.

Lifting me up, she took off my wrapper.
Feeling the breeze, I wanted to slap her.
Opening her mouth with shiny teeth inside,
This was the day this cupcake died.


I Love Pasta That’s No Doubt
By Madison Smith

Hear it boil from the pot
Crunch munchy from the box
I love pasta a whole whole lot

Short, fat, long, tall, just ask me I’ve got them all
Slippery, slimy, spaghetti
Whirly, twirly, colored noodles
Cheesy, wheezy, macaroni

Spiraled, curved, rigid, smooth, pasta makes me really groove
Pesto perfecto green and grand, even beefaroni from the can.

Rigatoni in my tummy
Amazing alfredo hot and yummy
With veggies or without
I love pasta that’s no doubt.

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Cupboard Crafts & Experiments: Liquid Fireworks!

Supplies:

  • Shallow containers or plates
  • Cotton swabs
  • Dish soap
  • Liquid food coloring
  • Milk (whole milk is best but any percentage will work)

Directions:

  1. Pour the milk in a shallow container, just enough to cover the bottom. (Experiment with cold or room temperature milk.)
  2. Add drops of liquid food coloring to the milk, drop them close to one another in the center for a more dramatic effect.
  3. Dip a cotton swab in a small amount of dish soap and then very lightly touch it to the side of the color. Watch the liquid fireworks!

What is happening? Milk is mostly water but it also has proteins, minerals, and fat. The milk fat molecules are more dense than the liquid food coloring therefore the food coloring floats on top. The dish soap weakens the chemical bonds separating the water loving molecules and the water fearing parts of the molecules, flinging them apart and creating beautiful bursts of color. Keep experimenting, if the action slows down pour out the milk mixture into a spare container and start over with fresh milk.

Watch this project at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hh7iAMH59ZU&t=7s

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Looking for games to play while apart from friends or family? Check out these free digital games, multi-player video games, and role-playing game resources!

Digital board games

  • Board Game Arena - Website with 175 board games that can be played in real time or as slowly as one move every other day if you can’t be online with other players at the same time. Some games must be started by a player with a paid account.
  • Dominion Online - Play the original deckbuilding game in your browser, on your own or with up to 5 other players.
  • Online Pictionary-style game - Play with up to 11 other friends! Choose how many rounds to play (each player draws once in each round), how long players have to draw, and even make your own list of words people will be drawing.
  • Scattergories Online - Scattergories in your browser - allows you to choose categories, number and length of rounds, and send the link to friends
  • Tabletopia - Website with over 800 board games in sandbox setups (the game will not tell you if you do something incorrectly). Some games may only be played with a paid account.
  • Print and play games

  • Distance gaming guide from Board Game Geek - This guide includes information on games you can play remotely if one person owns a copy of the board game and print and plays, including some from game publishers, including Cards Against Humanity: Family Edition and demo versions of a number of games from Asmodee.
  • PNPArcade - This catalog of print and play games includes nearly 100 for free.
  • Role-playing game resources

  • D&D Beyond - Create a Dungeons and Dragons character in your browser and connect them to a campaign with your party. This can replace a paper character sheet - track spell slots and hit points, level, take a short or long rest, etc.
  • DriveThruRPG - This RPG store offers thousands of items, including core rulebooks and adventures in a variety of rule systems, for free or pay what you want.
  • Dungeons and Dragons material from Wizards of the Coast - New content is added daily, Monday through Friday, for Adventurer’s League players, new players, and families alike.
  • Roll20 - Online virtual tabletop for role-playing games, including maps, assets, and chat. A number of adventure modules are available for free.
  • Multiplayer video games

  • Mobile only
    • Mario Kart Tour - Race against your friends.
    • QuizUp - Test your knowledge against a friend in more than a thousand categories.
    • Song Pop 2 - Be the first to identify the song or artist from a short clip.
    • Words with Friends 2 - Test your vocab against a friend in this Scrabble-like app.
  • PC only
    • Card Hunter - Lead a party on a fantasy adventure, using cards based on the items you equip. Multiplayer is available after the introductory adventure. Available in browser or through Steam.
    • League of Legends - Choose your champion and work with your four teammates to destroy the opposing team's Nexus.
    • Runescape - Explore and go questing in the fantasy world of Gielinor - this is the world's largest free MMORPG.
  • Multiple platforms
    • Brawhalla - This Super Smash Bros.-like game is available on Nintendo Switch, PC through Steam, PlayStation 4, and Xbox One, with crossplay between platforms. There are a number of modes available, and games run up to 8 players.
    • Dauntless - Become a Slayer, hunting more and more powerful Behemoths, either solo or with up to four players. Available on Nintendo Switch, PC through Epic Games Store, PlayStation 4, and Xbox One, with crossplay between platforms.
    • Fortnite - The uber popular battle royale is available on mobile, Nintendo Switch, PC through Epic Games Store, PlayStation 4, and Xbox One.
    • Realm Royale - This fantasy battle royale has you pick a class, lets you craft items at forges around the map, and when you die... you become a chicken. If you can survive as a chicken for 30 seconds, you're back in! Available on Nintendo Switch, PC through Discord or Steam, PlayStation 4, and Xbox One.
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