What's New!

Pikes Peak Library District is pleased to announce the winners of the 2019 Jean Ciavonne Poetry Contest for Children:

Colin Bevan - "Bahamas"
Mayah Bolenbaugh - "The Essence of Warmth"
Eva Goroski - "Bioluminescent Beach at Night"
Brody Karr - "Papayalulu Paradise"
Sally Peterson - "The Mystical Land"
Jana Yuschalk - "Darkling Dwabidisador"


Bahamas
By Colin Bevan

Fisherman rip tonight’s dinner from the ocean
Bloody hands filet the dead fish
Smells of fresh fish turns my head
Salt fills the air rusting old boats
Charcoal beach fires cook todays catch
Warm water surrounds my feet
Small birds run from the waves
Boats dot the horizon for miles
Paradise, I hope I never leave


The Essence of Warmth
By Mayah Bolenbaugh

Firewood receives the spark
Steam rises from the bread, fresh from the oven
Soft snuggle from a purring kitten
Sip a large mug of cider under a changing tree in the fall
Enter a cabin to kick off winter’s freeze
Submerge in hot springs as the snowflakes dance
Comfort and serenity, as the shower pours through your hair
Earth is nourished by the elements
Now the sand takes in the sun
The day’s last hour bathed in dark orange sunshine on a summer’s day


Bioluminescent Beach at Night
By Eva Goroski

Twilight creeps up the coast
Waiting for the moon to come with a gleam
Shells adorn the beach like jewels
Stars twinkle and glimmer like diamonds
Tide pools shine with a radiant beam
The ocean has an eerie glow
Bioluminescent dinoflagellates show off in a chain of lights


Papayalulu Paradise
By Brody Karr

I dream of a land called Papayalulu
It’s a tasty paradise for me and you-you
It’s hard to get to - this is true-true
First you must make a papaya canoe-noe
Row your canoe-noe to the end of the sea
And soon Papayalulu you will see

As papaya trees sway in the papayamint breeze
You can paddle down to the Papaya Juice River with ease
You can even lean over and take a sip
But better take care - your canoe-noe might tip
Look out! What’s that I hear?
It’s Papaya Juice Falls - better stay clear!

Safe at last upon the shore
What’s that sound I cant ignore?
It’s the singing papaya birds high in the trees
A song so sweet my ears it does please
I think I’ll stay a while in this land
Papayalulu is oh so grand!


The Mystical Land
By Sally Peterson

I know a place, not far away
It glistens and it gleams.
I go there every time I sleep
It’s called the “Land of Dreams.”

So when I sleep I don’t count sheep
Or toss and turn in vain.
I just fly to the “Land of Dreams”
In my one-man twinbed plane.

Each night I fly right out the door
And pass the moon and sun.
I’m going to the “Land of Dreams”
To have some dream like fun.

And when I land on snow white sand
A lovely sight I see.
A wondrous civilization is
Stretched out in front of me.

A mountain looms above you
If you look to the west.
On the east there is a river
And a town where you can rest.

There are bubbles in the air
That are floating in the breeze.
You can smell the scent of honey,
And hear the rustling trees.

Then my views were interrupted
By a woman clad in white.
She was the noble Queen
Of this land of truth and right.

“Welcome” she said. “Welcome
Won’t you come to my estate”
And she pointed to a castle
With a shiny marble gate.

“Of course” I said, “how gracious,
How could I refuse?”
We started towards the castle
And she told me all the news.

We walked into the town
Where the buildings stand so tall.
Everything is vibrant
From the big to really small.

The people there wear brilliant robes
Of many different hues.
There are feathers on their hats
And feathers on their shoes.

Aromas that are new
Are wafting towards my face.
I wonder what the food is like
In this amazing place.

We came to a kiosk
Where a man was selling food.
The food was shaped like balls
Some were red and some were blue.

They tasted sweet and juicy,
And suddenly I knew!
They were little berries,
And in the fields they grew.

A woman selling flowers
Gave me a bouquet.
It smelled just like sweet roses
In my wildflower spray.

The red flowers were the largest.
The blue flowers were large, too.
The yellow flowers were tiny.
My favorites were the blue.

We entered a cute clothes shop
Filled with rows of silk,
They were soft and they were comfy,
And smooth and cool like milk.

I chose a robe with red, blue, and yellow
For they would match my blooms.
I got nice shoes and a fine new hat
With fluffy little plumes.

Next we went to a pet shop
And saw a little dog.
He was not like mine at all, though.
My dog is brown like a log.

But this dog had new colors.
This dog was so bright!
So were all the other dogs.
It was a crazy sight!

I thought the cats were normal
Until I heard them speak.
They spoke such perfect English
I fought the urge to shriek!

A bird screeched in the background
And I turned in surprise.
The bird that was behind me
Had creepy human eyes.

The castle was our last stop
And it was getting late.
I was getting pretty tired
When I walked up to the gate.

The gates were swiftly opened.
We ran to a bench and sat.
It was nice to calmly sit there
And hear the robins chat.

Said the Queen “Oh heaven help us.
The feasts about to start”
We raced inside the castle
And I couldn't calm my heart.

I changed my clothes and entered
The room of the great feast.
There were many fruits and veggies
And for meat they had roast beast.

Many fancy people
Were invited here to dine.
Some were very famous.
All were very fine.

They all told me hello
Then sat and ate and ate.
I listened to their stories
As I cleaned off my plate.

A toast was to be done.
I lifted my cup.
Then “beep” went my alarm clock
And quickly I woke up.


Darkling Dwabidisador
By Jana Yuschalk

To bed I went on that ordinary night,
Not knowing in the morning what I may fight.
I woke up on a pile of hay,
Wondering what would fill my day.
Surprised and frightened, I immediately felt.
Suddenly, I wished I could just melt.
It seemed so sunny without any rain.
Smells of sweat hovered over the plain,
From jumping creatures who seemed insane.
The so-called “Dwabis” had a mane.
No animals were there.
Not even a bear.
I was informed, this was Dwabidisador.
Wow, I really need to study by geography more!
The Dwabi’s legs were awfully long.
They jumped then fell, I am not wrong.
The sound of jumping pounded the ground.
Their favorite hobby was jumping. That I found.
The language they spoke was also Dwabidisador.
At least I don’t need to study my languages much more!
“Dwabi fell down,” they said over and over again.
“English without pronouns,” I thought. Until then,
A young Dwabi who was probably only four,
Came up and said, “Why don’t you enter that door.”
I did as he commanded only to find,
A Dwabi whose name was Filabind.
He bought me a cupcake with sprinkles on top,
The smell was so sweet I thought I would pop!
All that was better than the taste, was the smell.
It looked and smelled like sweet caramel.
The taste was Dwabilicious.
Red velvet without mush.
After I finished my delectable cupcake,
I was sure Dwabidisador wasn't fake.
Then we departed and walked a long ways.
We entered a place called “Dwabi’s Good Maze”.
Since Filabind was my guide, he led me through,
A portal that said, “How do you do?”
Filled with wonder and awe, I heard a loud, “MOO!”
Before I knew it, I was back home on our farm.
Lying in my bed was my noisy alarm,
Trying to wake me up from my-dream?
What it was, it filled me with gleam!

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Supplies:

  • Tape
  • Glue
  • Scissors
  • Yarn or Twine
  • Different colors of copy paper, construction paper or use paper from old magazines
  1. Cut strips of paper 1 inch wide.
  2. Roll your paper into a circle to make the center of the flower. Tape shut.
  3. Make more circles or shapes and glue or tape onto center circle.
  4. String them up around the house to decorate for Spring.
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The Teen Art Contest is for teens and by teens. Teens create the art, and teens determine the winners.

The theme for our 2019 Teen Art Contest was "Opposites Attract! "

All of the artwork will be displayed at either Penrose Library, East Library, or Library 21c during the month of April.

Here are this years winners, which you can also view below!

Best In Show
“Poseidon’s Goldfish” by Cole R.

High School - First Place
“Opposites Attract” by Isaiah R.

High School - Second Place
“A Spectrum” by Preston S.

Middle School - First Place
“Steamy” by Teddy K.

Middle School - Second Place
“Concrete Jungle” by Ava K.

Coordinator’s Choice - High School
“Calm Before the Storm” by Lydia M.

Coordinator’s Choice - Middle School
“Strong and Courageous” by Chloe H.

You can view the winners here:

Teen Art Contest 2019 Winners

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April is the Month of the Military Child. Here are some picture books that relate to Bravery, Separation and Deployment for children. Click on the link below:

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Spring Snowflakes

March brings spring snow so make a colorful, spring-like snowflake!

Supplies:

  • Large coffee filter
  • Newspaper or cardboard to protect table
  • Dot markers or regular markers
  • Scissors
  • Glitter glue

On newspaper or cardboard, dot the entire coffee filter, let dry. Fold in half, in half again, and in half again so that it looks like a slice of pie. Cut point off, cut designs on all sides. Unfold and decorate with glitter glue or glitter and glue.

spring snowflakesspring snowflakes

spring snowflakesspring snowflakes

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Fork Art! Make a Lion

Supplies:

  • White or yellow paper
  • Googly eyes or white paper and Markers
  • Glue
  • Scissors
  • Fork
  • Cup to use to trace circle
  • Orange paint or use catsup and/or mustard!
  • Paper plate for paint

Trace circle onto the piece of paper by drawing around an overturned cup with a marker.
Draw the lion face. Make paper eyes with your scissors and glue or glue googly eyes on the drawing. Dip the flat tines of a fork in paint that you squirted onto a paper plate (or use mustard and/or catsup). Place the fork on the paper around the circle to make a mane. Let dry!

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Pikes Peak Library District sparks development, opportunity, and inspiration for everyone across El Paso County. Whether you've got a young one who's learning to read, or you're a lifelong learner looking for a new skill, the library has something for you.

We are excited to share stories of how the Library positively impacts the lives of our patrons.

To tell your story, click here to take our short survey or use the hashtag #shareyourspark on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram.

INSPIRATION

PPLD sparks inspiration. In this video, hear Price Strobidge's story about how the library helped him become Poet Laureate of the Pikes Peak Region.

OPPORTUNITY

PPLD sparks your opportunity. In this video, hear Allan's story about how the Library helped him improve his English language skills and provide him with GED test preparation. Read more about Allan's personal growth and development through the Library in this article from The Gazette.

DEVELOPMENT

PPLD sparks your development. In this video, learn about how our children's areas are free, safe places that encourage development and growth.

Stay tuned to learn how PPLD can spark your opportunity and your inspiration.

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Shirley Dale, PPLD's Maker in Residence for March/April 2019, has been creating in one way or another since childhood, applying this creativity in many different endeavors and careers. The joy of creating and the belief that everyone has the ability to create art have been constants throughout her life. Shirley has worked with many different mediums as a teacher and artist, always finding exciting, creative possibilities with whatever art materials are at hand. She is currently working with acrylics for monotype prints as finished pieces, and also for use in mixed media collage pieces.

Visit PPLD's Maker/Artist in Residence page for more information about this program.

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Love ooey, gooey slime? This is a great recipe to do at home. Click on the link below to see the directions to this cool project.

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Community Conversations: Urban Renewal: Impact on Stratton Meadows and Ivywild Neighborhoods

Community Conversations at Pikes Peak Library District is a new series of monthly events that invites the public to discuss current events and issues impacting the Pikes Peak region. We want to promote civil dialogue and greater understanding of different perspectives.

The City of Colorado Springs has cancelled the Wed., March 18 Community Conversation on Urban Renewal. For more information on this cancellation, click here.


Keep an eye on our calendar to join us for future conversations on timely and relevant topics to the Pikes Peak region. More information to come on locations and times!
  • April: Fountain Creek Watershed
    • When: Thu., April 16, 6 - 8 p.m.
    • Where: Fountain Library
    • Please join us for a community conversation on the Fountain Creek Watershed. We will host a panel discussion with experts on local water issues and initiatives followed by community dialogue regarding the Fountain Creek watershed.
  • June: Economic Development
  • July: Affordable Housing
  • August: Immigration
  • September: 2020 Election: Concerns and Aspirations
  • October: Police Relations
  • November: Military and Veterans
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Mixed Media Spring Art

Missing Spring? We have some weeks to go but in the meantime, try making this mixed media spring art. Mixed media only means using different art supplies to make a picture.

Supplies needed:

  • Markers (I used a black sharpie)
  • Color paper scraps
  • Glue
  • Scissors
  • White printer or construction paper
  1. Make a fun, crazy garden by cutting out your colored scrap paper pieces.
  2. Imagine your garden by placing pieces, then glue down.
  3. Add fun drawings to complete your garden.

Happy Spring!....soon.

mixed media spring artmixed media spring art

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What does the Fox say? I love you!

Supplies:

  • 1 Large heart - orange
  • 1 Medium heart – white – cut in half
  • 2 small hearts – orange
  • 3 small black circles or a black marker
  • Glue stick
  • Scissors

Instructions:

  1. Cut the white heart in half.
  2. Glue to the large orange heart.
  3. Turn 2 small hearts upside down and glue on the back for ears.
  4. Glue on black circles for eyes and nose or make eyes and nose with a black marker.
  5. Write a love note on the back.

What does the fox say?
I love you!

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Todd Parr, children's author, shows how he makes a book on his website, www.toddparr.com. He's given permission to share his material too. He's not only famous for great children's books, but valentines too.

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Have you heard about auto-renewals? Beginning Mon., Feb. 11, 2019, PPLD will save you the step of renewing your checkouts.

The day before items are due, the library’s system will automatically renew them if there are no holds and they haven’t already been renewed twice.

There are some exceptions to the materials that can be automatically renewed, including:

  • Rapid Read, Rapid View
  • eBooks, eAudios
  • Equipment
  • Interlibrary Loans

Patrons will receive an email notice letting them know what, if anything, was renewed as well as the new due date.

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Supplies:

  • White or light colored paper
  • Markers or crayons

Directions:

  1. Fold any size piece of paper in half. Fold one side up to meet the first fold.
  2. Create a picture of an animal or person on the folded paper. Make sure to put the mouth of the creature at the fold.
  3. Then open up the picture and make your creature look scary!
  4. Fold it back up and show the folded picture your friends and family. Say, “Isn’t it cute?” Then open up your picture quickly for a fun joke.

scary pictures projectscary pictures project

scary pictures projectscary pictures project

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February is “Random Acts of Kindness” month. Click the link below to see great reading suggestions.

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Overdue books? Fear not. Pikes Peak Library District will no longer charge you for being a little bit late on your returns.

The library will officially eliminate overdue fines Fri., Feb. 1, just in time for a county-wide celebration of Library Lover’s Month. Patrons will no longer be financially penalized for books that are late in returning to the library.

“Our mission as an organization is to eliminate barriers to information and resources, not create them,” said Director of Library Services Tim Blevins. “We had a trial run of eliminating overdue fines and didn’t see longer hold times for patrons, but did see a positive impact on borrowing. It makes perfect sense for us to permanently eliminate these fines.”

Fines, Blevins says, are particularly prohibitive for the community’s most vulnerable families. Plus, overdue fines accounted for less than one percent of the library’s overall revenue in 2017.

There will still be fees assessed for lost or damaged materials. Materials are considered lost if they are 21 days overdue.

Additionally, Pikes Peak Library District will roll out automatic renewals later on in Library Lover’s Month. The day before books are due, the library’s system will automatically renew them up to two times, so long as no other patron placed a hold on the material.

There are some exceptions to the materials that can be automatically renewed, like rapid reads, e-materials, and equipment checkouts.

“What we’ve seen here, and in library facilities across the country, is that by taking these steps to increase ease of access to materials, use of library resources and checkouts is positively impacted,” Blevins said. “We’re here to help people access the resources they need to achieve their goals. This is just one more way for us to do a better job of achieving that mission.”

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We want to celebrate your successes! Pikes Peak Library District is looking for stories about how our resources and staff have helped enrich minds, fuel learning and growth, spark imagination and ideas, build community and connections, and/or achieve goals.

To tell your story, click here and take our short survey.

Comments: 9

One of the great benefits of reading is that it allows us to learn about the lives of people who are different from us. Enjoy some of the delightfully unique books in this list with your children to expose them to the diverse people, cultures and customs that make up our country and our wonderful world. Click on the pdf link below to see great books for kids:

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Supplies:

  • Bowls or containers to use to make the ice
  • Large tray with sides or cookie sheet
  • Salt
  • Liquid watercolors or food coloring – please note that food coloring can stain
  • Droppers and/or a spoon

Instructions:

  1. Fill a variety of bowls or containers with water and freeze them at least overnight. Different sizes and depths are preferred.
  2. Remove the ice shapes from their containers and place them on the plastic tray or cookie sheet.
  3. Give your child a bowl of table salt – the cheaper the better. Have them sprinkle it on the top of their ice. They can also use a dropper to drop warm water on.
  4. Watch as ravines form down the side of the ice as the salt melts it!
  5. Squeeze a little bit of a food coloring onto the ice and watch what happens! The food coloring or liquid watercolors will highlight the ravines, crevasses, and tunnels that are forming.
  6. Discuss how salt melts the ice.
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Snap Circuits Arcade

Create over 200 exciting circuits that support STEM curriculum with Snap Circuits Arcade! Snap together a disco ball, word fan, human alarm and more! For ages 8 and up. This kit is available at our Educational Resource Center.

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Khet

Play chess using lasers with the Laser Game, Khet! Strategically bounce the laser off of mirrors in order to “hit” your opponent’s pieces. For ages 9 and up. This game is available at our Educational Resource Center.

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For the 27th year in a row, Pikes Peak Library District is being recognized for excellent financial transparency.

The Government Finance Officers Association awarded Pikes Peak Library District the Certificate of Achievement for Excellence in Financial Reporting this month, the association’s highest award.

“The attainment of this award represents significant accomplishment by a government and its management,” the Government Finance Officers Association said in a press release. “This is the highest form of recognition in the area of governmental accounting and financial reporting.”

Each year, the association judges government organizations through an impartial panel. According to the association’s website, the program was designed to motivate government agencies to “go beyond the minimum requirements of generally accepted accounting principles,” with the goal of encouraging financial transparency by those agencies.

Earning this award illustrates an organization’s commitment to good stewardship of public dollars.

“This award is one of the highest honors a government organization can hope to achieve,” said Pikes Peak Library District Chief Financial Officer Michael Varnet. “To receive an award of this caliber so many years in a row is a testament not only to the finance team, but to the Library District as a whole. The group of people I work with each day truly has dedication to transparency and honorable financial reporting, and I am very proud to be part of such a team.”

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Kathleen Owings

The president of the Pikes Peak Library District Board of Trustees attended her last board meeting after ten years of service to the library.

Kathleen Owings will retire from the board as of Dec. 31, 2018. Owings first joined the board on Jan. 1, 2009, and was board president from 2012-2014 and in 2018.

Her fellow board members, library employees, and library leaders alike reminisced fondly on Owings’ contributions to the Library District and the community during her final board meeting on Dec. 11, 2018.

“While we are saddened to see Kathleen go, we feel very fortunate to have benefited from her leadership over the last ten years,” said PPLD Chief Librarian and CEO John Spears. “Her direction over the last decade has carried the library forward in such a positive way. Kathleen has put us on a path that will help us best serve all of our patrons across El Paso County for years to come.”

Owings is a Principal and Financial Advisor with Westbilt Financial Group. She is also a current and past member of several boards throughout the Pikes Peak Region, including the Children’s Literacy Center, Colorado Springs Chamber of Commerce, Colorado Springs Leadership Institute, and the local chapter of the West Point Alumni Association.

The new president of the PPLD Board of Trustees, Wayne Vanderschuere, will take over the role on Jan. 1, 2019. Terms on the board are five years, and board leadership changes annually.

Comments: 4

Hot Cocoa Mix:
Materials Needed:

  • Glass Jar (We use a Starbucks® Frappuccino® Jar)
  • Twine
  • Gift Tag
  • Ziploc bag (optional)

Ingredients:

  • Hot Cocoa Mix
  • Mini M&M’s®
  • Chocolate Chips (Mini)
  • Peppermint Swirl Candies
  • Marshmallows

What to Do:

  1. Pour two servings of Hot Cocoa mix into the jar. (Depending on your mix, you’ll require different amounts.)
  2. Pour 1 Tablespoon of M&M’s and 1 Tablespoon of mini chocolate chips into the jar.
  3. Put your peppermint candies and ¼ cup of marshmallows into a bag, and carefully squish into the jar.
  4. Seal up the jar.
  5. Use twine to attach a gift tag.
  6. Your mix is ready for gift giving!

Note: If you don’t mind a little mix on your marshmallows and candies, you can leave the bag out.
For an added look, you can paint your caps. Just make sure they dry before you try to seal the jar up!

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